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Commercial lease covers it all – right?

Gavel to Gavel appears in The Journal Record. This column was originally published in The Journal Record on April 20, 2017.


Jennifer Ivester Berry is a member of the firm’s Transactional Practice Group as an Of Counsel attorney. Jennifer represents individuals, privately-held and public companies in connection with a wide range of commercial real property matters.

By Phillips Murrah Of Counsel Attorney Jennifer Ivester Berry

For those involved in leasing commercial real estate – whether new to leasing or a seasoned industry pro – signing a lease can be a daunting endeavor.

The devil is in the details, and, more often than not, many standard forms omit critical considerations. Accordingly, a close examination of the terms is essential for a quality commercial lease.

Below are five important points to consider when leasing commercial property. These items are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather a starting point for the purposes of evaluation.

• Experience – Knowing the background and temperament of the other party is important. Is leasing commercial property the landlord’s primary business? Will a management company operate the property? Is the tenant established or just starting out? A knowledgeable, cooperative working relationship is imperative for a successful commercial lease.

• Type of lease – Details of what costs are covered and how they are apportioned should be carefully reviewed. For example, leases often described as triple net, meaning that the tenant is responsible for all costs associated with the leased premises other than structural repairs, can actually be a blend of two types of leases, triple net and gross. A gross lease splits the structural repairs and operation expenses between the landlord and tenant.

• Identification of leased premises – Often the outline of the space and delineation of its parameters is an attachment that does not make it into the lease until the end of the negotiations. It is important to verify up front that what is provided meets both parties’ expectations.

• Costs – Payments under a commercial lease can be categorized in several different ways, including rent, common area maintenance, assessments and dues. Awareness that a lower rental rate might be counterbalanced by a monthly fee for maintenance of the property, which is set to automatically increase each year, is essential. The ultimate focus should be on the full monthly cost, regardless of what it is called under the lease.

• Insurance – Insurance coverage requirements will vary based on lease type. It is important to identify two things: what the lease requires and whether such coverage is available, and whether the cost associated therewith is factored into the overall lease costs.

Jennifer Ivester Berry is an attorney at Phillips Murrah who specializes in commercial real estate property and energy-related matters.

PM attorney Jennifer Ivester Berry to discuss wind energy for ABA CLE course

Jennifer Ivester Berry is a member of the firm’s Transactional Practice Group as an Of Counsel attorney. She has a solid reputation in guiding real estate transactions with a focus on development, financing, and energy. Jennifer represents individuals, privately-held and public companies in connection with a wide range of commercial real property matters.

Jennifer Ivester Berry has a solid reputation in guiding real estate transactions with a focus on development, financing and energy. Jennifer represents individuals, privately-held and public companies in connection with a wide range of commercial real property matters.

Phillips Murrah attorney Jennifer Ivester Berry will be a panelist for a discussion about issues that arise in the wind development project process as a result of competing land uses. She will also present strategies for addressing such disputes, specifically competing interests of the oil and gas industry with renewable energy development.

The program, The World of Wind Development – Recent Land Use Cases and Issues, is a part of the American Bar Association’s Continuing Legal Education program.

Format: Webinar
Date: Wednesday, July 22, 2015
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 pm ET
Linkhttp://bit.ly/1f5j0JN

The panel will also include:

The panelists will discuss other land use issues in wind development projects and recent cases in the United States and Canada addressing challenges to wind energy development:

  • Zoning and permitting issues
  • Wildlife studies related to wind energy projects
  • Common land use provisions included in wind farm easements
  • Recent case law in Ontario dismissing claims that wind development would adversely impact public health
  •  Off-site wind development

Eminent domain raises questions when used on behalf of the private sector

Jennifer Berry Photo

Jennifer Ivester Berry is an attorney with a solid reputation in guiding real estate transactions with a focus on development, financing and energy. She represents individuals, and privately-held and public companies in connection with a wide range of commercial real property matters.

Q&A from NewsOK: Phillips Murrah attorney Jennifer Ivester Berry discusses the what, when, how and why of eminent domain.

View Jennifer Ivester Berry’s attorney profile page here.

By Paula Burkes – Published: March 25, 2015
View the article at NewsOK.com here.

Q: What is eminent domain?

A: Eminent domain, condemnation, taking power — these words sound ominous and forceful, as if the party on the receiving end has no choice but to succumb to the directive of the imposing party and give up something for nothing. However, stop for a moment and remember that with most constitutionally created powers come some series of checks and balances. Eminent domain, in its most simplistic form, is the power to acquire private property for a public use, provided that the property owner receives just compensation. Some of the most recognizable uses of the eminent domain power are for the establishment of roadways, hospitals, railroads and utilities. In more recent years, the use of eminent domain for purposes of economic development has sparked a public policy debate that will no doubt continue for years to come.

Q: When can eminent domain be used?

A: The power of eminent domain originates from the state’s constitution, and the Oklahoma Legislature enacts statutes that set out the manner, purpose and through whom such power may be exercised — a system of checks and balances. For example, municipalities are granted a general power of condemnation under the state statutes, so long as the taking is for a public use and the property owner is adequately compensated. There are certain circumstances and uses that the Legislature has identified as being for the benefit of the public and thus created specific statutes covering them, for example, the removal of dilapidated buildings, the improvement of water and sewer systems, and urban renewal. The Legislature also conferred the power of eminent domain on utility companies, public enterprises and common carriers. Private individuals or companies also may utilize the power of eminent domain for agricultural, mining and sanitary purposes, as well as for establishing private roadways where access in an issue.

Q: How does eminent domain work?

A: The party seeking to condemn property will usually have attempted to negotiate with the landowner to acquire the property. That said, if a municipality or utility company is dealing with numerous parcels of land with countless owners, using the condemnation proceeding can simplify the process and avoid negotiations that may or may not be successful. Once the condemnation proceeding is filed, the court appoints three individuals (commissioners) who will examine, evaluate and inspect the property. The commissioners are instructed to return an award to the court that reflects the fair market value of the property taken, as well as any injury to any part of the property not taken. The award is payable to the landowner even if the landowner owner contests the award. If, as a result of a contest, a jury finds the fair market value of the property to be an amount in excess of 10 percent of the commissioners’ award, the landowner may be entitled to reasonable attorneys and expert fees.

Q: Why do we need eminent domain?

A: Using eminent domain to obtain property for roadways and utilities is rarely a source of contention, even if ultimate ownership of such property is by a private party. The more controversial issue is whether the government can use its eminent domain power to aid a private party. The U.S. Supreme Court has blessed the use of eminent domain as a governmental incentive for economic development. However, numerous states, including Oklahoma, have taken a more narrow view and require that the use of eminent domain power for economic development must involve the removal, elimination or prevention of blight. Proponents of this power, whether the broader or more narrow application of it, argue that without it being available as an incentive for private development, economic development would be stifled significantly. Others, however, feel that failure to value individual property rights actually dissuades potential residents and business from moving into a community and as such cripples any potential for economic growth. One thing is clear, eminent domain will continue to be used for economic development and as such continue to be a debatable issue in the private sector.