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Norman elected Chapter Adviser for University of Oklahoma sorority

Alpha Omicron Pi’s house at the University of Oklahoma campus

Alpha Omicron Pi’s Xi Chapter members recently elected Phillips Murrah Attorney Kendra M. Norman to serve as Chapter Adviser for the sorority’s University of Oklahoma house.

Chapter Adviser is elected annually and advises the Chapter President, the Leader’s Council—which consists of women elected as leaders of the chapter—as well as the chapter as a whole, which is made up of over 250 women.

“I serve as a resource, a role model, and a coach to the chapter and its members,” Norman said. “I have the privilege of working one-on-one with the amazing women of Xi Chapter and have gotten to watch them grow as leaders, achieve their goals, and become professionals, and I am so proud to call each one of them my sisters.”

The Chapter Adviser also serves as the chairman of the chapter’s Alumnae Advisory Committee, comprised of alumnae who mentor the women on the Leader’s Council individually. Norman has served on the committee for about five years in various leadership roles.

“Alpha Omicron Pi’s motto is ‘Inspire Ambition,’ and I truly take that to heart as I practice law at Phillips Murrah P.C. and volunteer with Xi Chapter of AOII,” she said. “I find that being a collegiate member and now an alumna member of AOII has been an empowering experience, and it is amazing to see what women can do when they work together and build each other up.

“I am thrilled to be able to take on this new challenge and to have this opportunity to work side by side with the women of Xi Chapter as well as Inspire Ambition through my service.”

Norman represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters in the Firm’s downtown Oklahoma City office.

Gavel to Gavel: Gender parity and the rise of women in the boardroom

It should come as no shock that, although women make up just over half of the U.S. population, they are underrepresented in corporate executive management, as well as in the boardrooms of public companies in the U.S. This is often due to stereotypes that characterize female leaders as abrasive, aggressive and emotional. This disparate societal perception rewards certain characteristics in men while condemning them in women, which damages women striving for leadership roles.

Kendra Norman Web

Kendra M. Norman represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters.

A 2016 Catalyst report found that in the U.S., women made up only 21.2% of the S&P 500 board seats.

A recent push for diversity on corporate boards of directors may change the gender lines of corporate culture. For example, California is the first state to statutorily require female representation on boards of directors.

In 2018, roughly 25% of California-based companies had no female directors on their board. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law requiring all public companies having principal executive offices in the state to have at least one woman on the board by the end of 2019. By the end of 2021, any California public company with five directors must have a minimum of two female directors, and those with six or more directors must include at least three women. The law imposes a $100,000 fine for a first-time violation and a $300,000 fine for subsequent violations.

California follows several European countries, including Germany, France, Norway, and Sweden, which have implemented quotas and fines to increase female representation in the boardroom. Additionally, shareholder advisory firms such as Institutional Shareholder Services and Glass, Lewis & Co. are now using gender diversity as a factor for shareholder vote recommendations.

While a government-mandated requirement may not be the ultimate solution, it could accelerate the achievement of gender equality.

Such a change in gender representation is likely to benefit companies, as gender and culture diversity results in diverse perspectives, which is likely to improve a company’s performance. It will also create less gender discrimination in recruitment, promotion, and retention.

While Oklahoma continuously ranks in the bottom of states for women when it comes to the income gap, workplace environment, education, and health, Oklahoma ranks 20th with respect to the executive positions gap, according to a recent 2018 WalletHub study. While there is much room for improvement, there may be hope for Oklahoma in achieving executive gender equality.


By Phillips Murrah Attorney Kendra M. Norman

Gavel to Gavel appears in The Journal Record. This column was originally published in The Journal Record on April 18, 2019.

NewsOK Q&A: Some mortgage, business loans may need updating with looming bank rate phaseout

From NewsOK / by Paula Burkes
Published: November 16, 2017
Click to see full story – Some mortgage, business loans may need updating with looming bank rate phaseout

Click to see Kendra M. Norman’s attorney profile

Kendra M. Norman represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters.

Q: What is LIBOR?

A: The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) is the daily calculation of an average of estimated interest rates that a panel of around 20 banks calculate they’d be charged to borrow from other banks. LIBOR serves as the primary reference interest rate that’s overwhelmingly used by lenders to set their own interest rates including mortgage and student loan lenders, as well as credit card companies. It’s been used since 1986 for this purpose. LIBOR hasn’t been without its scandals, and in 2012, media outlets began to allege that LIBOR was being manipulated by the very banks that set the rate, leading to fines levied against financial institutions and prison sentences for individuals involved in the rate manipulation as well as regulatory backlash. The Financial Conduct Authority is the regulatory agency for LIBOR, and on July 27, in an apparent effort to replace rather than reform LIBOR, Chief Executive Andrew Bailey announced the recommendation that LIBOR be phased out at the end of 2021 due to a lack of confidence in the calculation as well as unwillingness among banks to use it.

Q: What’s the future of LIBOR and how could it affect consumers?

A: LIBOR has been used pervasively as a benchmark rate for loans for over 30 years. Most consumers have at least one agreement in effect that references LIBOR, whether it be a mortgage or business loan. Many of these contracts are long-term and won’t expire before 2021 when LIBOR will be phased out. Some of these loan contracts based upon LIBOR contain a fallback provision and reference an equivalent or alternative interest rate to be used in place of LIBOR, laying the foundation for those instruments to be governed by LIBOR’s eventual successor. However, lenders and borrowers should review existing loan documents, especially those continuing after 2021, to ascertain whether they’re LIBOR-based loans and then whether they reference an alternative rate in the event that LIBOR is no longer published. Those documents without fallback provisions or an alternative rate should be amended and updated so that they reference a substitute or new rate to avoid legal uncertainty once LIBOR is replaced.

Q: What will replace LIBOR?

A: LIBOR’s administrator will continue to produce LIBOR until 2021 and possibly after that time if banks continue to contribute to the benchmark rate, so there’s still time to figure out what will replace LIBOR, but there’s currently no go-to replacement. Lenders and borrowers should consider use of fallback provisions and flexible amendment provisions due to the unavailability of LIBOR in the future.

Doing business in multiple states

Gavel to Gavel appears in The Journal Record. This column was originally published in The Journal Record on March 9, 2017.


Kendra M. Norman represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters.

By Phillips Murrah Attorney Kendra M. Norman

One of the first considerations in forming a business entity is where to organize or incorporate. However, there is another important and frequently overlooked inquiry, which is where else to qualify that entity to do business.

If a business entity functions outside of the state in which it was formed, it may need to qualify to do business in that foreign state. Each state has different requirements for what constitutes doing business for this purpose. For many states, certain activities within that state, without more, do not require qualification. These activities usually include maintaining bank accounts, carrying on activities concerning internal corporate affairs, acquiring indebtedness, owning real or personal property, or conducting isolated transactions completed in 30 days.

Thus, the threshold for requiring businesses to qualify is relatively high. While these acts may not constitute doing business for qualification purposes by themselves, the general standard for qualification is based on the cumulative effect of all of the activities performed in the state in question. Generally, to be required to qualify, the foreign entity must transact a substantial part of its ordinary business within the state. To constitute ordinary business, activities must be indispensable to the business rather than simply incidental.

Failure to qualify can result in many penalties. Entities can be barred from access to the courts in states where they are unqualified, including Oklahoma. This can mean they are unable to enforce contracts entered into in these states. Unqualified entities, and individuals acting on their behalf, can be fined by foreign states in which they do business, including Oklahoma, where there is a statutory provision imposing fines. These fines can include backward-looking fees and franchise taxes to the state for the period in which the entity has operated while unqualified in the state, as well as a fine per transaction while unqualified.

The best course of action when faced with these issues is to determine where a business entity will transact substantial business and examine the specific statutory and case law of that state to determine if qualification is required.

Practitioners should keep in mind that what constitutes doing business for qualification purposes may not be the same threshold for what constitutes doing business for taxation and service of process purposes in some states, including Oklahoma.

Kendra M. Norman is an attorney at Phillips Murrah, where she represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters.

Attorneys Hilary Hudson, Kendra Norman inducted into Order of the Coif

Kendra M. Norman and Hilary A. Hudson after being inducted into Order of the Coif.

Phillips Murrah Attorneys Hilary A. Hudson and Kendra M. Norman were inducted into the Order of the Coif at the University of Oklahoma College of Law’s Order of the Owl Dinner on March 6 at the Oklahoma Memorial Union.

“I’m very proud to be selected as a member of the Oklahoma Chapter of the Order of the Coif. It is such an honor, and I’m very excited about this achievement,” Norman said. “Being selected as a member of the Order of the Coif means always knowing that I did my best throughout law school.”

The Order of the Coif is a national law school honorary society founded to encourage scholarship and to advance the ethical standards of the profession. The Oklahoma chapter, chartered in 1925, may elect each fall from the graduating class — which includes all those graduating during the fall, spring and summer terms — those graduates who rank in the top 10 percent academically.

Each candidate elected to membership must be thought worthy of the honor in the opinion of the voting members of the Oklahoma chapter, according to the OU College of Law’s website.

“It’s a terrific honor to be inducted into The Order of the Coif,” Hudson said. “Law school was a rewarding experience, but it was also grueling.

“When you begin law school, you have no idea how your grades will turn out, so you just work as hard as you can and hope for the best. It’s great to have something like membership with The Order of the Coif to look to and remember what I accomplished. The induction is also a perfect opportunity to spend time with professors and peers and hear about the wonderful things the other inductees are accomplishing as new attorneys.”

Learn more about the Order of the Owl event here.

Phillips Murrah welcomes two new attorneys

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Attorney Hilary A. Hudson

Phillips Murrah is proud to welcome Hilary A. Hudson and Kendra M. Norman to our Firm.

Phillips Murrah welcomed Hudson to the Firm’s Litigation Practice Group as an associate attorney.

Hudson represents individuals and both privately-held and public companies in a wide range of civil litigation matters.

Kendra M. Norman

Attorney Kendra M. Norman

Norman has joined Phillips Murrah’s Transactional Practice Group as an associate attorney.

She represents individuals and businesses in a broad range of transactional matters.

Norman and Hudson are recent graduates of the University of Oklahoma School of Law.

Phillips Murrah attorneys and summer clerks visit nursing home

REZ Luau

From left: Marchi McCartney, Kendra Norman, Nancy Parrot, William Sobral, Hilary Hudson, Judge Patricia Parrish, Ray Zschiesche, Monica Ybarra, Travis Weedn and Chance Pearson.

Friday afternoon, Aug 7, the Oklahoma County Bar Association Community Service Committee had a Luau-themed party for the residents of the Edwards Redeemer Nursing Home.

Phillips Murrah attorneys Director Ray Zschiesche and Monica Ybarra were on hand to dance and visit with the Edwards Redeemer Nursing Home residents, along with our summer clerks, Hillary Hudson, Kendra Norman, Jace White and Ben McCaslin.