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Director Jim Roth launches OCU Law alumni association

Jim Roth, Phillips Murrah Director and Oklahoma City University School of Law Dean, announces the revival of OCU Law's Alumni association at a meeting in early September.

Jim Roth, Phillips Murrah Director and Oklahoma City University School of Law Dean, announces the revival of OCU Law’s Alumni association at a meeting in early September.

Jim Roth, Phillips Murrah Director and Oklahoma City University School of Law Dean, announced the reestablishment of OCU Law’s Alumni Association in September.

“The law is a service profession, and here at OCU Law, we are a service-oriented school,” Roth said. “As an alumnus of the school, I have always admired that OCU is committed to helping create lawyers with a solemn responsibility for upholding the rule of law and for ‘doing good’ in the broader community.”

With more than 7,000 OCU Law alumni invited to join the revamped Association, Roth comprised a Board of Directors of OCU Law alumni, including Phillips Murrah attorneys Monica Y. Ybarra and Martin J. Lopez III, to oversee development and progress. Upon announcement, the Board of Directors voted to elect Ybarra as the first Chair of the association.

“This is an exciting time for OCU Law, and there’s no better way to rally our alums and get everyone plugged in to that energy than by resurrecting the OCU Law Alumni Association,” Ybarra said. “I’m looking forward to leading the Board of Directors as we fashion an association that will represent the interests of our vast alumni network, provide meaningful services to alums, students, and community partners, and be a channel through which alums can support the law school.”

The association is in the planning stages for the coming year, and the Board will be holding a launch event in November to kick off the association, said Ally Rodriguez, Director of Alumni Relations.

To learn more about OCU Law’s Alumni association, visit their website here.

 

Phillips Murrah’s legal team welcomes tax attorney

Jessica Cory

Jessica N. Cory

Phillips Murrah law firm is proud to welcome Jessica N. Cory to our downtown Oklahoma City office.

Phillips Murrah welcomed Jessica to the Firm’s Tax Law Practice Group as an associate attorney.

In her practice, Jessica represents businesses and individuals in a wide range of matters, including general tax planning, business succession planning, and the structuring of complex transactions.

Jessica has advised clients regarding corporate and general business matters, including choice of entity, formation, tax-free reorganizations, acquisitions and dispositions, and tax planning.  She has particular experience working with flow-through entities, including disregarded entities, limited liability companies, partnerships, and S corporations.  Jessica has also successfully represented clients in disputes with the Internal Revenue Service.

Prior to entering private practice, Jessica gained valuable experience service as a judicial clerk for United States District Court Judge Robin Cauthron in the Western District of Oklahoma.  She then received her Masters of Law in Taxation at New York University School of Law and worked for a law firm in Houston, Texas before joining Phillips Murrah.  Jessica is licensed in both Oklahoma and Texas.

Jessica has written and presented on a variety of tax topics, including choice-of-entity in light of the 2017 tax reform, the tax implications of foreign ownership of real property, changes to the partnership audit procedures enacted in 2015, and defending against the trust fund recovery penalty.

Jessica grew up in Killeen, Texas but now lives in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with friends and family, traveling, and training for her next race.

Roth: An open letter of thanks

By Jim Roth, Director and Chair of the Firm’s Clean Energy Practice Group. This column was originally published in The Journal Record on June 4, 2018.


Jim Roth is a Director and Chair of the firm’s Clean Energy Practice.

Roth: An open letter of thanks

Occasionally in life our journeys come full circle in a way that allows for reflection and gratitude, such as this, my last recurring column in this newspaper.

As a 13-year-old I was a paper boy for my hometown’s Wednesday and Friday Johnson County Sun newspaper. I would come home from school, find the large bundles on my doorstep, set about folding them and placing them inside the large canvas side bag and ride my bike while throwing the papers onto the lawns of the subscribing homeowners, often until dusk. In the rain the papers got a plastic bag, otherwise green rubber bands bound the tri-folded news. And then once a month I would walk the neighborhood knocking doors to collect the $2 per subscriber. I much preferred the time on my bike rather than the time chasing money. That hasn’t changed.

What has changed for me personally is that for the past nine years I have had the privilege to share a weekly column on the inside of a newspaper and a really good paper at that. The Journal Record is Oklahoma’s oldest business publication and since 1903 scores of hardworking reporters, designers, editors, printers and staff have consistently created an award-winning daily general business and legal publication. It’s been an honor to be an occasional columnist among those hard-working folks.

What has changed for the industry since 1903 is monumental. Gone are the Norman Rockwell-esque newspaper routes across America, replaced in part by online subscribers and clicks to drive readers’ interest and revenue. Color, font size, specialty sections and even the size of headlines compared to the size of news stories have all changed. But one thing hopefully has remained true: Americans need real and accurate news to not only sustain, but to improve, the greatest experiment in human governance, this American adventure of ours. And we need to actually read it for it to matter.

Joseph Pulitzer famously said: “What a newspaper needs in its news, in its headlines, and on its editorial page is terseness, humor, descriptive power, satire, originality, good literary style, clever condensation and accuracy, accuracy, accuracy!” And although he is best known for the Pulitzer Prizes created from his endowment of Columbia University, he is less known, ironically, for the use of “yellow journalism” (along with his chief rival William Randolph Hearst) to appeal to broader masses through lesser researched, or less accurate “news.”

Today, my car radio presets for satellite news scroll through CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, CNBC and the BBC. When those five prove frustratingly weak, biased or more ads than substance, the sixth preset is the comedy station for a much-needed break from it all. But we can’t take too many breaks from it all, or the hot air and yellow journalism risk replacing the importance of accuracy, fair reporting, deep thinking and the power of sunshine for our society.

So Thank You. Thank you to you readers for your interest in this publication and the importance of good journalism from these full-time professionals at The Journal Record. Thank you to those of you in journalism and news today who actually strive to be accurate, who know being balanced is more than a slogan and it requires genuine effort, and to those of you working long hours to provide today’s 24/7 news appetite, but who know that no matter how late the story, the truth is always timely.

I am grateful for you. And I am grateful for the chance to have shared energy and environmental ideas and observations for Oklahoma and beyond these past years, in a publication that strives every day to deliver the truth. Thank you.

Jim Roth has been appointed to serve as the new dean of the Oklahoma City University School of Law beginning July 1, and as an alum of OCU Law, will be enjoying that life’s full-circle opportunity of service.

Director Jim Roth teaches OCU Energy Law seminar for Spring 2017

Jim Roth is a Director and Chair of the firm’s Clean Energy Practice.

Jim Roth is a Director and Chair of the firm’s Clean Energy Practice.

Jim Roth, Director and Chair of Phillips Murrah’s Clean Energy Practice Group, began a new role at Oklahoma City University’s School of Law last week.

“Dean Valerie Couch reached out to me and asked if I would be interested in their inaugural ‘Distinguished Practitioner in Residence’ effort for this Spring Semester,” Roth said.

Roth will teach a seminar class on Energy Law and Regulation and initiate an Energy Roundtable for the Spring 2017 semester.

“My ultimate hope is to inspire law students and young lawyers to pursue a career in the dynamic field of energy, or at least encourage them to have a deeper understanding of all the issues and cross-currents that drive energy in America and beyond,” he said.

For more information about OCU’s School of Law, click here.

Attorney teaches Behavioral Health Law course at OCU

Mary Richard is recognized as one of pioneers in health care law in Oklahoma. She has represented institutional and non-institutional providers of health services, as well as patients and their families.

Mary Richard is recognized as one of pioneers in health care law in Oklahoma. She has represented institutional and non-institutional providers of health services, as well as patients and their families.

Phillips Murrah Attorney Mary Holloway Richard is teaching Behavioral Health Law at the Oklahoma City University School of Law this Spring semester.

The course will cover a broad spectrum of behavior health topics including: basic mental illness diagnoses, licensure laws related to behavioral health providers of all types, reimbursement and financing issues, liability concepts related to the dangerous patient, consent and release of information, social and community responses to mental illness and substance abuse disorders and current policy and regulatory developments in the field, Richard said.

In conjunction with the American Health Lawyers Association’s Behavioral Health Task Force of which she is Vice Chair, Richard plans to bring in speakers from across the state and give the class better exposure to the subject matter, to the larger context of the healthcare industry and to people who work in the field, she said.

This class follows Richard’s Fall course which was a survey and introductory course to Health Law.

Attorney appointed adjunct professor of OCU School of Law

Rodney L. Cook is experienced in all areas of tort litigation with special emphasis in the practice areas of product liability, warranty, insurance and fraternity law.

Rodney L. Cook is experienced in all areas of tort litigation with special emphasis in the practice areas of product liability, warranty, insurance and fraternity law.

Phillips Murrah Attorney Rodney L. Cook has been appointed as an adjunct professor at Oklahoma City University School of Law where he will be teaching Pretrial Litigation this semester.

He continues to serve as an adjunct professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Law where he has taught Civil Pretrial Litigation for ten years.