Posts

Data breach still compliance concern for health care providers

cyber breach artworkHIPAA concerns, established in 1996 and evolving ever since, continue to be a very real compliance concern for healthcare providers. As an example, last year HHS collected $28.7 million from providers of healthcare services and payors for responses to data breaches that HHS considered inadequate.

According to Modern Healthcare, this is $5.2 million over the prior high for settlement and penalties reported in 2016.  The data for 2018 may be skewed by the $16 million settlement by Anthem for a breach involving approximately 79 million people. That breach occurred in 2015, and the settlement was record-setting for the Office of Civil Rights.

Changes being discussed by HHS include the possibility of sharing a percentage of civil monetary penalties or monetary settlements with affected individuals; revisions to HIPAA rules that facilitate the additional information demanded by coordinated care, outcome-focused care and value-based payments; and reconciliation of behavioral health care’s 42 CFR Part 2 rules with HIPAA.


Mary Holloway Richard portrait

Mary Holloway Richard

If you are concerned about how this issue affects your business or practice, contact Mary Holloway Richard, who represents and counsels clients on issues including healthcare compliance, health services contracting, reimbursement audits and appeals, OIG investigations, and regulatory and corporate matters. 

Mary can be reached at 405.552.2403 or at mhrichard@phillipsmurrah.com.

Click here to view Mary’s Attorney Profile page.

Healthcare cost-cutting trend ties money to results

By Mary Holloway Richard, Of Counsel

healthcare-shutterstock-02The trend toward decreasing costs in healthcare has seized upon value-based care – tying physician compensation to performance and outcome measures. These measures are also being used in contract negotiations with third party payors and healthcare plans.

Counsel for institutional and non-institutional providers are at the table providing advice about a number of important contractual terms and their ramifications including appropriate and measurable metrics for calculating bonuses and penalties and, if shared savings are at issue, how they should be split. For those who have been involved in negotiations of traditional fee-for-service contracts, this will seem like a fundamental change. It may also seem like a change that narrows the potential for disputes.

However, numerous issues will continue to be important to providers. For example:

  • Are the metrics used as incentives or penalties?
  • Are the selected benchmarks easily measurable and attainable?
  • Do they raise regulatory issues such as potentially impacting volume in an unacceptable way or spawn any other results that could be construed to be anticompetitive?

While these questions have yet to be answered by Oklahoma courts, we can look to decisions from other states and consider ourselves forewarned as to the nuances and potential pitfalls in negotiating and drafting these terms.