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Kanye Family Law Lessons – Digging for Gold in Oklahoma

By Robert K. Campbell

Music has permeated our society since the beginning of time. Artists have touched on all topics, such as politics, religion, social matters, etc. In 2005, Kanye West had a number-one hit song with “Gold Digger.” Urban Dictionary defines the term “gold digger” as “someone who only likes people because of how much money they have, or because of the items they own.”

In this article, I will discuss some of the lyrics and how West’s sentiments would apply based upon Oklahoma laws. For purposes of this article, any gender specificity as it relates to the term “gold digger” should be disregarded, as the term is gender neutral. After all, anyone can dig for gold. I am not, however, suggesting explicitly, implicitly, or in any other manner, that either Kim Kardashian West or Kanye West is a gold digger.

The first lines in verse two of the song begin: Eighteen years, eighteen years / She got one of your kids, got you for eighteen years

Attorney Robert Campbell

Robert K. Campbell’s legal practice is focused in the area of family law, specifically concentrated in matters of divorce, legal separation and custody issues. He represents clients by providing steady, thoughtful and resourceful counsel to advise them through significant family and life transitions.

This is mostly a true statement. Oklahoma law requires both parents to provide financial support for their children during a divorce, or in situations where the parents were never married. Typically, one parent pays the other parent child support. Child support is generally owed until the minor child reaches the age of 18 or graduates high school, whichever is later. Considering the lyrics above, if you have a child, you will be obligated to pay child support until at least the age of 18, so, the above lyrics are, in essence, correct.

“Gold Digger” lyrics go on to state: I know somebody payin’ child support for one of his kids / His baby mama car and crib is bigger than his … She was supposed to buy your shorty Tyco with your money / She went to the doctor, got lipo with your money

This sentiment is often a complaint that the child support payor makes about paying child support. The argument is that the payor pays the other parent monthly child support, and the payor does not know how the support is being spent by the other parent.

In Oklahoma, a child support obligation assumes that all families incur certain child-rearing expenses comprised of housing, food, transportation, basic public educational expenses, clothing, and entertainment. Absent a binding and enforceable agreement between the parents, there is no requirement that the child support funds be used for any specific purpose. In other words, yes, it could happen that a parent pays child support and the other parent uses it for a car, home, or whatever else they wish.

In a dramatic twist of events, “Gold Digger” lyrics include lines that state: Eighteen years, eighteen years / And on the 18th birthday he found out it wasn’t his?

Imagine believing you are the parent of your child, to then find out after 18 years that the child was not yours after all. This can and has happened. There is a published opinion in Oklahoma touching on this very point.

In Miller v. Miller, 1998 OK 24, Mr. Miller sued his ex-wife and her parents for damages for inducing him to marry his ex-wife and knowingly misrepresenting to him that she was pregnant with his child. Mr. Miller sued his ex-wife under the theories of fraud, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and that his ex-wife was unjustly enriched equal to the amount of child support he paid his ex-spouse per month.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court held that Mr. Miller had a viable claim for fraud and intentional infliction of emotional distress, but not for unjust enrichment for the child support he paid his ex-wife. To avoid such a situation, if there is any question or doubt that you are the father of a child, then genetic testing can be performed to establish your parentage, or lack thereof, to hopefully avoid the situation described above.

To side-step the mishaps that West sings about in “Gold Digger,” he attempts to provide his listeners with some words of wisdom. “Gold Digger” contains the lyrics: Holla, “We want prenup! We want prenup!” / It’s something that you need to have / ‘Cause when she leave yo’ ass, she gon’ leave with half

While these lyrics are not bad advice, the part about leaving you with half without a “prenup” is not always true. In Oklahoma, the courts divide the marital estate equitably, which does not always mean equally. However, in most circumstances, the Court attempts to divide the marital estate equally, but there may be circumstances that warrant a disproportionate division.

Oklahoma does recognize and enforce a valid prenuptial agreement. However, at this time, it does not recognize a post-nuptial agreement. Thus, if you want to determine how your estate will be divided upon death or divorce, you must execute a prenuptial agreement prior to marriage.

Additionally, while a prenuptial agreement can allow a couple to determine matters related to the division of their estate and support alimony, it cannot be used to determine custody, visitation, and child support. Issues related to children are always subject to the Court’s determination and what is in the best interest of the children.

And remember, as I stated earlier in the article: Now, I ain’t saying she a gold digger


For more information about this article or any other Family Law inquiries, please call Robert K. Campbell at 405.606.4797 or email him at rkcampbell@phillipsmurrah.com.

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Director presents for OU Women and Gender Studies class

Nicholle Jones Edwards

Nicholle Jones Edwards’ practice focuses on family law, labor law and general civil litigation. Her family law practice includes litigation, complex custody issues and valuation issues.

Nicholle Jones Edwards, Director and member of the Family Law Practice Group, presented to the Women and Gender Studies class at the University of Oklahoma on Oct. 23.

The class is comprised of mostly seniors and students looking to attend law school. Her presentation focused on custody and the impact of gender on custody disputes.

Edwards advised that Oklahoma law has enacted statutory measures to prevent gender bias in these matters, lending the example that in divorce cases, mothers’ rights are no greater than fathers’ rights under the law.

However, the issue in same-sex divorces as with any other divorce will focus on the best interest of the child, she said.

Edwards previously served on the Advisory Board for the Women and Gender Studies program and continues to lend support.

To learn more about OU’s Women and Gender Studies class, click here.