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Attorney Mary Holloway Richard delivers presentation on behavioral health protections

Mary Holloway

Mary Richard represents institutional and non-institutional providers of health services, as well as patients and their families.

Mary Holloway Richard, Phillips Murrah healthcare law attorney, participated in a CLE webinar panel for healthcare counsel on Wednesday.

Strafford Publications presented the webinar on protecting patients’ behavioral health information, and disclosure requirements and limitations.

Richard’s presentation defines best practices for healthcare providers in situations where a potential breach in patient privacy may arise.

The panel addressed the distinction between instances when the release of behavioral health information is permissible or required.

A slideshow of the presentation is available to view here, and those interested in viewing the webinar may do so via Strafford’s website here.

For more information about Phillips Murrah’s Healthcare Law practice, click here.

Director hosts presentations on workplace regulations

Byrona J. Maule is a Director and litigation attorney as well as Co-Chair of the Firm’s Labor & Employment practice group. She represents executives and companies in a wide range of business and litigation matters with a strong emphasis on employment matters.

Byrona J. Maule is a Director and litigation attorney as well as Co-Chair of the Firm’s Labor & Employment practice group. She represents executives and companies in a wide range of business and litigation matters with a strong emphasis on employment matters.

Phillips Murrah Director Byrona J. Maule gave two presentations in November, one for Cornerstone Credit Union League and the other to the Women’s Mastermind Group, regarding potential changes in labor and employment matters.

The presentations covered new wage and hour regulations regarding overtime that were slated to go into effect on December 1, 2016.

Maule gave an in-depth look at the regulations, including key components and salary basis changes it would impose as well as steps employers should take to prepare for if it went live.

“Employers should have conversations with employees who are changing from exempt to nonexempt so that the employees understand the impact of that change,” she said. “Employers should also review record keeping requirements for nonexempt employees – as these requirements are very different for nonexempt employees as opposed to exempt employees.”

Maule referenced pending lawsuits against the regulations which have since been put on pause by a national injunction by a federal court in Texas.