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Medicaid, work and community engagement

This column was originally published in The Journal Record on November 27, 2019.


Introducing Becky-Pasternik-Ikard

Rebecca “Becky” Pasternik-Ikard is a lawyer, a nurse and a Medicaid program director who brings decades of experience to assist Phillips Murrah healthcare clients in copy with reimbursement, including negotiating payments, audits and appeals, and other regulatory issues related to governmental payments of providers.

By Phillips Murrah Of Counsel Attorney Becky Pasternik-Ikard

Physicians, hospitals and other health care providers continue to experience not only shrinking reimbursement rates, but also an increasingly formidable regulatory presence. A recent controversial Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services policy reform permits states to require certain Medicaid beneficiaries to engage in meaningful work or in volunteer activities as a condition for continued eligibility.

This policy is a fundamental shift in Medicaid eligibility, eliciting criticism from the health care community that employment should not be a condition for coverage and access to medical treatment.

Although overall Medicaid enrollment has declined over the past two years, Medicaid enrollment has increased since the Affordable Care Act, driven primarily by newly eligible adults gaining coverage under Medicaid expansion, with the highest enrollment increases seen in Medicaid expansion states. This increase includes not only the Medicaid expansion population, but also those individuals who were currently eligible, but not enrolled. These people learned of coverage due to extensive outreach efforts by expansion states.

In its Jan. 11, 2018 State Medicaid Director letter entitled Opportunities to Promote Work and Community Engagement among Medicaid Beneficiaries, CMS announced the new policy and clarified that states could predicate continued Medicaid eligibility on participation in work requirements, including community service, caregiving, education, job training, and substance use disorder treatment. The basis for this policy is Section 1901 of the Social Security Act. Divisive reactions have opponents characterizing it as inconsistent with Medicaid’s objective of health coverage and an impermissible Medicaid enrollment reduction strategy.

Eighteen states have sought approval to implement work requirements. Although CMS has approved all requests submitted by Medicaid expansion states, the implementation of three, Arkansas, Kentucky and New Hampshire, has been interrupted or stopped due to legal challenge.

Kentucky, a Medicaid expansion state, received CMS approval the day after the new policy was announced. Kentucky had submitted a Section 1115 waiver authority request in 2017 incorporating work requirements. Shortly after Kentucky’s January 2018 approval, a legal challenge was filed. Kentucky’s implementation has been blocked twice by a federal district court judge and is under appeal. Kentucky Gov.-elect Andy Beshear has declared plans to rescind Medicaid work requirements.

In July 2017, Indiana submitted its request to CMS proposing work requirements for its Medicaid expansion enrollees. Although Indiana received CMS approval in February 2018, implementation did not begin until January 2019. In September 2019, a lawsuit was filed challenging Indiana’s program. Indiana has suspended its work requirements pending the outcome of the litigation.

In March 2018, CMS approved Arkansas’ June 2017 request to amend its Section 1115 waiver to implement work requirements. Implementation began in June 2018. In August 2018, a lawsuit was filed challenging Arkansas’ approval. A year after approval, the federal district court set it aside. The matter is under appeal.

In May 2018, New Hampshire became the fourth state to win approval for work requirements, with implementation scheduled in March, but it was postponed due to a lawsuit filed the same month. Consistent with the rulings for Kentucky and Arkansas, in July 2019, the same federal district court judge set aside the approval for New Hampshire.

State leadership and Medicaid programs nationwide await the outcome following the Oct. 11 oral arguments related to the appeals for Arkansas and Kentucky. Oklahoma, a non-expansion state, has a pending waiver request to impose work requirements on certain Medicaid beneficiaries. If approved, this would add barriers to access and continuity of care, which are likely to place additional administrative and financial burdens on hospitals, physicians and other health care providers.

Becky Pasternik-Ikard is the former CEO of the Oklahoma Health Care Authority and former state Medicaid director. She currently practices Of Counsel for Phillips Murrah law firm in Oklahoma City.