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405 Magazine selects Phillips Murrah for 2020 Oklahoma Top Attorneys

Phillips Murrah is honored to have 13 attorneys selected as Oklahoma Top Attorneys for 2020 by 405 Magazine. Attorneys are selected for the list by an online peer-voting and research process facilitated by DataJoe Research across various practice areas.

For more information on each listed attorney, visit their profile by clicking on their portrait or contact information below:

Oklahoma Top Attorney for Banking and Financial Law:

. Mark Lovelace Oklahoma Top Attorney Banking and Financial Law

J. Mark Lovelace, Director
405.552.2404
jmlovelace@phillipsmurrah.com

 

Donald A. Pape Oklahoma Top Attorney Banking and Financial Law

Donald A. Pape, Of Counsel
405.364.3346
dapape@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Business Law:

Robert O. O'Bannon Oklahoma Top Attorney Business Law

Robert O. O’Bannon, Director
405.552.2483
roobannon@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Commercial Litigation:

Thomas G. Wolfe Oklahoma Top Attorney Commercial Litigation

Thomas G. Wolfe, Director
405.552.2401
tgwolfe@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Health Care Law:

Mary Holloway Richard Oklahoma Top Attorney Health Care Law

Mary Holloway Richard, Of Counsel
405.552.2403
mhrichard@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Intellectual Property Rights:

Martin G. Ozinga Oklahoma Top Attorney Intellectual Property Rights

Martin G. Ozinga, Of Counsel
405.606.4721
mgozinga@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Labor and Employment:

Byrona J. Maule Oklahoma Top Attorney Labor and Employment

Byrona J. Maule, Director
405.552.2453
bjmaule@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Land Use – Environment:

Jim A. Roth Oklahoma Top Attorney Land Use Environment

Jim A. Roth, Director
405.552.2417
jaroth@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Medical Malpractice Defense:

G. Calvin Sharpe Oklahoma Top Attorney Medical Malpractice Defense

G. Calvin Sharpe, Director
405.552.2413
gcsharpe@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Oil and Gas:

Elizabeth K Brown Oklahoma Top Attorney Oil and Gas

Elizabeth K. Brown, Director
405.552.2423
ekbrown@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Real Estate:

Sally A. Hasenfratz Oklahoma Top Attorney Real Estate

Sally A. Hasenfratz, Director
405.552.2431
sahasenfratz@phillipsmurrah.com


Oklahoma Top Attorney for Tax Law:

Robert O. O'Bannon Oklahoma Top Attorney Business Law

Robert O. O’Bannon, Director
405.552.2483
roobannon@phillipsmurrah.com

 

Dawn M. Rahme Oklahoma Top Attorney Tax Law

Dawn M. Rahme, Director
405.606.4770
dmrahme@phillipsmurrah.com

 

View the full list of attorneys here:

Best email practices to avoid legally binding contracts or litigation

In this article, Oklahoma City Attorney A. Michelle Campney discusses email practices that could be considered legally binding.

A. Michelle Campney

As a litigation attorney, A. Michelle Campney represents companies in a wide range of business litigation matters with an emphasis on the construction industry.

What are the general legal concerns regarding conducting business through email?

It is estimated that there will be almost 3 billion email users by the end of this year, with an average of 128 business emails sent and received per person, per day. Often, only passively mentioned in employee handbooks and with little to no training during onboarding, employers and employees adopt varied practices for email use. The sheer volume of emails creates logistical problems for businesses (e.g., server space, data protection), but it can also create legal issues when exchanges can bind companies or reveal confidential, privileged or personal information.

How can emails bind someone until they actually sign an agreement?

Does the party you are working with know that you require hard copy agreement with handwritten signatures? If not, and if the email contains all the material terms and the facts, and circumstances surrounding that show that you were conducting the transaction electronically, then you could have an enforceable agreement under the Oklahoma Uniform Electronic Transactions Act (“UETA”).

But no one actually signed the agreement, so how can it be enforceable?

Not all agreements have to be signed to be enforceable, and specifically under the UETA, a signature only need be “attributable to a person if it was the act of the person.” Furthermore, an electronic signature under the act is “determined from the context and surrounding circumstances at the time of its creation, execution, or adoption … .” While Oklahoma does not have any case law on the issue, a Texas court found a simple “Thank you, Clyde” typed above the signature block was sufficient for a signature. Parks v. Seybold (Tex. App.—Dallas, 2015). Additionally, some courts (including those in Texas) broadly interpret the signature requirement to include an automatically generated signature block.

What are other potential concerns for email?

Let’s say that your company is involved in litigation regarding a contractual dispute. Most attorneys ask that all communications, including email communications, regarding the issue be turned over during the discovery process. While the communication may not ultimately be admissible in court, if there are emails between employees discussing the dispute and the surrounding facts and circumstances, those will generally have to be turned over to the other side. Additionally, if certain individuals are involved then you may have to turn over all emails regarding that person. Thus, if any mentions of any disciplinary action regarding that person or even your own personal feelings about the person are on email those may have to be turned over. While the emails may not ultimately impact your case, they could embarrass your company.

Are there any practices or policies that would help alleviate the concerns surrounding email?

While policies and procedures will be specific to each type of business and its standard practices, at the most basic level, having a robust email use policy will set a good foundation and, if properly drafted, help educate your employees on what to do and not to do. One important thing to remember is that email will only continue to grow as a means of communication. Setting good groundwork for how it is to be used in your company may help prevent issues down the road.

 

Published: 4/11/19; by Paula Burkes
Original article: https://newsok.com/article/5628396/doing-business-by-email-can-cause-legal-concerns

Team of Phillips Murrah employees participate in Race for the Cure

Phillips Murrah's Rae White, Michelle Campney, and Nanette Morris stand with two friends at Race for the Cure.

Phillips Murrah’s Rae White, Michelle Campney, Nanette Morris and her family stand at Race for the Cure.

A group of Phillips Murrah employees joined together in late October to participate in a 5K for Race for the Cure at Bicentennial Park at the Civic Center Music Hall.

“My family and I have participated in the Race for the Cure for a number of years,” Paralegal Nanette Morris said. “We have had friends, luckily not any family members, that have been affected by breast cancer and have seen how devastating the disease can be.

“Other employees of Phillips Murrah have been touched by breast cancer in a number of ways and so asking the Firm to participate was an easy decision.”

Morris, along with A. Michelle Campney, Lisa McAlister, Rae White, and their families showed their support for the cause.

“Cancer, of all kinds, has affected my friends and family and I wanted to show my support by participating,” said White.

To learn more about Race for the Cure and to find ways to donate to the cause, visit the Susan G. Komen website here.