NewsOK Q&A: Advance directives provide care guidance for end of life

From NewsOK / by Paula Burkes
Published: April 28, 2016
Click to see full story – Advance directives provide care guidance for end of life

Click to see Mary Holloway Richard’s attorney profile

Mary Richard is recognized as one of pioneers in health care law in Oklahoma. She has represented institutional and non-institutional providers of health services, as well as patients and their families. She also has significant experience in representing providers in regulatory matters.

Mary Richard is recognized as one of pioneers in health care law in Oklahoma. She has represented institutional and non-institutional providers of health services, as well as patients and their families. She also has significant experience in representing providers in regulatory matters.

Q: What should we know about decision-making in the future to care for ourselves?

A: The mechanism for providing guidance to your health care professionals and to your family at the end of your life is a legal document known as an “advance directive.” The process of completing your advance directive is an important one because it makes you think about yourself in various end-of-life situations. You are telling your providers, in advance, what you will allow them to do, to the extent possible.

Q: Is there a specific form for an advance directive in Oklahoma?

A: Advance Directive forms are available at the Oklahoma Bar Association at www.okbar.org/Portals/14/PDF/Brochures/advance-directive-form.pdf. The advance directive statute requires that you must be 18 or older, of sound mind, and have two witnesses 18 or older and who aren’t beneficiaries of your will. The advance directive needn’t be notarized. It’s effective when your health state is such that your physician and another physician conclude that you no longer are able to make your own health care decisions.

Q: What kinds of provisions can I make for myself with an advance directive?

A: Advance directives provide treatment and care directions for three different conditions. You can provide directions to your providers when your condition is determined to be terminal. A terminal condition is one which, in your physician’s opinion, will result in your death within six months. You also can provide directions about your care when you’re persistently unconscious, which means that your condition is irreversible and you aren’t aware of your environment or of yourself. You also can provide your wishes for your care when you’re in an end-stage condition or an irreversible condition, and medical care would be ineffective. An advance directive also gives you the option of directing future artificially-administered food and water if you’re unable to take those by mouth in the three conditions described. You also can provide for organ donation in the advance directive.

Q: What else should I know about advance directives?

A: These decisions aren’t easy and it’s helpful if you involve your family in your decision-making so that they understand your wishes. Second, keep copies of your advance directives in a number of places and let your family members and loved ones know where they are so that guidance will be readily accessible when needed. Finally, under Oklahoma law, an advance directive for mental health also is available.

Q: Is there a specific form for the advance directive for mental health?

A: The Oklahoma Advance Directive for Mental Health form is found in our Oklahoma statutes, Title 43A Section 11-106. This advance directive allows you to provide for an alternate decision-maker for your mental health treatment. For the seriously mentally ill, this is important in terms of facilitating care when needed, at moments of crises. The advance directive on mental health becomes effective if the attending physician or psychologist determines that the ability to receive and evaluate information and to communicate decisions is impaired so that one lacks the capacity to refuse or consent to mental health treatment. “Capacity” is a determination made by the health care provider.